Nine Tips for Indoor Safety in Winter Weather

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When it comes to winter, there are steps you can take inside the home to protect your family. Some are very basic, such as making sure all vents are free from objects. Give them plenty of space around any heaters, radiators and the like. A three-foot barrier is recommended. Another good tip to remember is that if you have a central gas heater, use gas-powered space heaters, or have a fireplace, install carbon monoxide detectors in your home. Too many people overlook the dangerous fumes you could breathe without knowing.

Now let’s look at some other smart tips for a safe indoors during winter.

1: Never use extension cords to plug in your space heater.

2: In case of power loss, use battery-powered flashlights or lanterns rather than candles, if possible.

3: Since winter is the time most spent inside, have your home checked for radon, mold and chemical exposure.

4: More than $2 billion are lost in house fires during the winter. Do you have up-to-date fire extinguishers, fire detectors with fresh batteries, and most importantly, an evacuation plan in the event of fire? If you have kids, please make one! Draw up a plan, showing rooms, hallways, doors and windows. Set a meeting place outside. Then, practice the drill!

5: Buy salt and shovels in the fall before the first snowfall.

6: Dress your baby for sleep. Don’t rely on blankets. Babies lose heat faster than adults.

7: If your pipes inside freeze, warm with a hair dryer. Do NOT use a torch.

8: Eat wisely. A good diet actually can make your body warmer.

9: Always supervise kids if you’re using a space heater. Kids alone with heaters are a bad mix!
We hope you follow these tips and practice good common sense when it comes to being safe around the home. Stay warm. Stay safe!

Sources:
http://safety.lovetoknow.com/Winter_Safety_Tips

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/winter.html

https://dps.mn.gov/divisions/hsem/weather-awareness-preparedness/Pages/indoor-winter-safety.aspx

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/duringstorm/indoorsafety.asp